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fastcompany:

Facebook user Peter Thoeny brought this to our attention. This targeted Facebook ad featuring a machine gun seems inappropriate after the #Newtown school shooting…

Companies need to do a better job managing social media campaigns, especially during times of National tragedies. It goes for digital publishers, exchanges, and the advertiser themselves.  With so much automation occurring to be “relevant” to content, there are not enough checkpoints to prevent this type of ignorance.  It could easily have been an ad for an inappropriate movie or TV show.

fastcompany:

Facebook user Peter Thoeny brought this to our attention. This targeted Facebook ad featuring a machine gun seems inappropriate after the #Newtown school shooting…

Companies need to do a better job managing social media campaigns, especially during times of National tragedies. It goes for digital publishers, exchanges, and the advertiser themselves.  With so much automation occurring to be “relevant” to content, there are not enough checkpoints to prevent this type of ignorance.  It could easily have been an ad for an inappropriate movie or TV show.

fastcompany:

Undoubtedly, some of the people who see the Sex Invaders photo exhibit at Hionas Gallery in New York this month, will be hard pressed to say which is a bigger turn-on: the bikini-clad models or the images of Storm Troopers and Donkey Kong. The collection of eight photographs is the latest installment from the “Ultravelvet Collection,” the work of LA-based couple Eric Hajjar and Meredith Rose. Their work is a fusion of two popular but unrelated subjects, in this case, video games and erotica. In some of the pictures, images of bikini-clad women are overlaid with scenes from Space Invaders and Pac Man. In others, the models appear to be wearing Darth Vader masks.

This video takes me back to the ground breaking video A-Ha did for “Take Me On” when MTV was still relevant.

Dec 7
Jimmy Kimmel Loves Commercials

“Jimmy Kimmel Live” (JKL) may be the best late night talk show on TV and it will be a real threat to Letterman and Leno once it moves to 11:35 p.m. weeknights.  Jimmy has mastered the monologue, made hysterical segments with celebrities, and has created some of the best pranks, especially when he asks his audience to do them (if you have never seen them, look up “Jimmy Kimmel Prank” on YouTube).
There is no doubt that JKL can attract viewers:
According to Anne Sweeney, co-chair of Disney Media Networks and president of Disney/ABC Television Group, the show grew 3% in total viewers during the 2011-12 broadcast season, its most-watched in five years.  It was also the only late-night broadcast talk show to increase viewers year over year.
There is no doubt that JKL can grow ad revenue:
Advertisers boosted their spending on Kimmel’s show by 20 percent last year to $98 million, according to Kantar Media (NY Post, 8/22/12), the outdoor stage for music is sponsored,and the live commercials at the top of the show are often funny.
However, I can only watch JKL on my DVR, because there are SO MANY commercials. Below is a break out of the 11/27 show, commercial time is noted in (Minute:Seconds) during the “65” minute show:
1.      A promo for the night’s show (:30)
2.      Commercial Pod #1: Three commercials (1:30)
3.      JKL live commercial (1:20)
4.      Commercial Pod #2: Five commercials (2:00)
5.      JKL Monologue
6.      Commercial Pod #3: Nine Commercials (3:30) + Two ABC Promos (:30)
7.      JKL Guest 1
8.      Commercial Pod #4: Nine Commercials (4:15) + One ABC Promo (:15)
9.      JKL Guest 2
10.  Commercial Pod #5: Ten Commercials (4:15) +  Two ABC Promos (:15)
11.  JKL Sponsor Card + Concert Series Sponsor (:30)
12.  Commercial Pod #6: Ten Commercials (4:00) +  One ABC Promo (:10)
13.  JKL Musical Act
14.  Commercial Pod #7: Five commercials (2:30)
15.  JKL Sign Off
So, there is almost 22 minutes of commercials during the 65 minute show, or 33% of the program.  That may be on par for Late Night, but the breaks seem extraordinarily heavy at the beginning and end of the show.
Advertisers routinely pay less for time slots that air after midnight, to the point that most networks have rearranged their late-night ad breaks in recent years to bring more commercials into the first half hour,(Ad Age, 8/21/12); JKL “starts” at 12:00 a.m., but does not really begin until 12:05 a.m. And after the second guest, there is a whopping NINE MINUTES of commercials before the musical guest.
I don’t know how many Media Buyers are paying attention to the amount of clutter their spots are surrounded by, but I would give it a second look.  It will be interesting to see if the move to 11:35 p.m. changes the format.
As I mentioned earlier, I love the show and will continue to watch it – just on my DVR.

Jimmy Kimmel Loves Commercials

“Jimmy Kimmel Live” (JKL) may be the best late night talk show on TV and it will be a real threat to Letterman and Leno once it moves to 11:35 p.m. weeknights.  Jimmy has mastered the monologue, made hysterical segments with celebrities, and has created some of the best pranks, especially when he asks his audience to do them (if you have never seen them, look up “Jimmy Kimmel Prank” on YouTube).

There is no doubt that JKL can attract viewers:

According to Anne Sweeney, co-chair of Disney Media Networks and president of Disney/ABC Television Group, the show grew 3% in total viewers during the 2011-12 broadcast season, its most-watched in five years.  It was also the only late-night broadcast talk show to increase viewers year over year.

There is no doubt that JKL can grow ad revenue:

Advertisers boosted their spending on Kimmel’s show by 20 percent last year to $98 million, according to Kantar Media (NY Post, 8/22/12), the outdoor stage for music is sponsored,and the live commercials at the top of the show are often funny.

However, I can only watch JKL on my DVR, because there are SO MANY commercials. Below is a break out of the 11/27 show, commercial time is noted in (Minute:Seconds) during the “65” minute show:

1.      A promo for the night’s show (:30)

2.      Commercial Pod #1: Three commercials (1:30)

3.      JKL live commercial (1:20)

4.      Commercial Pod #2: Five commercials (2:00)

5.      JKL Monologue

6.      Commercial Pod #3: Nine Commercials (3:30) + Two ABC Promos (:30)

7.      JKL Guest 1

8.      Commercial Pod #4: Nine Commercials (4:15) + One ABC Promo (:15)

9.      JKL Guest 2

10.  Commercial Pod #5: Ten Commercials (4:15) +  Two ABC Promos (:15)

11.  JKL Sponsor Card + Concert Series Sponsor (:30)

12.  Commercial Pod #6: Ten Commercials (4:00) +  One ABC Promo (:10)

13.  JKL Musical Act

14.  Commercial Pod #7: Five commercials (2:30)

15.  JKL Sign Off

So, there is almost 22 minutes of commercials during the 65 minute show, or 33% of the program.  That may be on par for Late Night, but the breaks seem extraordinarily heavy at the beginning and end of the show.

Advertisers routinely pay less for time slots that air after midnight, to the point that most networks have rearranged their late-night ad breaks in recent years to bring more commercials into the first half hour,(Ad Age, 8/21/12); JKL “starts” at 12:00 a.m., but does not really begin until 12:05 a.m. And after the second guest, there is a whopping NINE MINUTES of commercials before the musical guest.

I don’t know how many Media Buyers are paying attention to the amount of clutter their spots are surrounded by, but I would give it a second look.  It will be interesting to see if the move to 11:35 p.m. changes the format.

As I mentioned earlier, I love the show and will continue to watch it – just on my DVR.

fastcodesign:

A few decades back, when the music industry was booming and record companies had more money than they knew what to do with, a curious phenomenon played out on Sunset Boulevard in Los Angeles. Bands started showing up on billboards.

I have always liked great Outdoor executions. Times Square is still the King of Outdoor Advertising, but it is mostly digital and LED screens. This glimpse into the past makes me nostalgic and would love to see another industry use it to this excess.

fastcodesign:

A few decades back, when the music industry was booming and record companies had more money than they knew what to do with, a curious phenomenon played out on Sunset Boulevard in Los Angeles. Bands started showing up on billboards.

I have always liked great Outdoor executions. Times Square is still the King of Outdoor Advertising, but it is mostly digital and LED screens. This glimpse into the past makes me nostalgic and would love to see another industry use it to this excess.

It is a cliche to say how powerful the internet is, or how it has transformed lives. Watch how a mother was able to reunite her son with an old friend. Enjoy!

fastcompany:

Our picks: 2012’s Best Business Books. What would you add to this list?

I would add Social Media Is Bullshit by B.J. Mendelson

Brand’s New Day

We love brands, don’t we?

We grew up with them in our pantry. We wear them to be hip, or show that we are serious about working out. We drive them to make a statement that we are rich, practical, care about the environment, etc.

We want Cheerios! Not Store Brand O’s.

Thanks to TV, radio, print, and outdoor we were always being exposed to brands; quoting their slogans, singing their jingles, rooting for their mascots- and they became part of pop culture.  We know so much about brands who they are, you can play games to show you know the brands we love.

 

But, do you LIKE them?

After years of brands talking TO you and wanting you to tell others how great they are, the internet offered brands the opportunity to hear from you. First, on their websites, but traffic and engagement were low. Then, brands learned learned to go where the fish were: Facebook.

Besides measuring success in sales, brands could see who “liked” them and use it as a tool to measure against. Most brands don’t have any other social media strategy besides Facebook, so when a user “likes” them, they count on the messages they post to get to them.

A new research study from Group M finds the share of Facebook users seeing organic posts from a brand they “like” is down 38%. Brands will need to start paying for their posts to be seen more. www.adage.com/article/digital/study-reach-organic-facebook-posts-engagement/238365/

The number reached may be lower, but the engagement among those being reached is higher, a good sign for developing the relationship among core users. Once that is established, the impressions are more valuable.

It is time for brands to concentrate on the true advocates for them. Not only the ones that “like” them, but the ones that love them.